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November 15, 2012

An Open Letter to the Student Body,

I am not writing to express any feelings of embarrassment, disappointment, or anger toward the students who shouted racist language and displayed violent behavior after the announcement of our president’s reelection. I am writing to express my concerns regarding the response of the university community to that event.

November 15, 2012

On election night, communication sciences and disorders senior LaQuoyia Murray posted a response to the disturbance on campus that followed the reelection of President Obama on her Facebook page.

On election night, communication sciences and disorders senior LaQuoyia Murray posted a response to the disturbance on campus that followed the reelection of President Obama on her Facebook page.

“It basically just said how disgusted I was with the people that participated in the quote, unquote riots that happened that night,” she said. “I felt disgusted that students at our school would even go to those lengths with the racial slurs.”

Murray said she did call those students “racists” in her post.

November 15, 2012

On election night, communication sciences and disorders senior LaQuoyia Murray posted a response to the disturbance on campus that followed the reelection of President Obama on her Facebook page.

On election night, communication sciences and disorders senior LaQuoyia Murray posted a response to the disturbance on campus that followed the reelection of President Obama on her Facebook page.

“It basically just said how disgusted I was with the people that participated in the quote, unquote riots that happened that night,” she said. “I felt disgusted that students at our school would even go to those lengths with the racial slurs.”

Murray said she did call those students “racists” in her post.

November 15, 2012

Nov. 6 was Election Day, and, as a foreigner, this was the first time I got to experience the election firsthand. I watched the live coverage of the election with Americans on the second floor of City Grocery. I was the only non-American there. Every time Barack Obama won a state, everybody in City Grocery would cheer and applaud. After 10 p.m., when all the states had stopped voting, Obama finally succeeded in being re-elected. Everybody stood up and shouted, “Four more years, four more years ...” People hugged each other and cheered.

November 12, 2012

Character is what you do when no one is watching. We have all heard that phrase at some point in our lives, but our generation has a much higher hurdle to jump to live up to these words.

November 12, 2012

Character is what you do when no one is watching. We have all heard that phrase at some point in our lives, but our generation has a much higher hurdle to jump to live up to these words.

November 8, 2012

In one word, I was shocked.
Shocked like so many other members of the Ole Miss family — students, alumni, faculty and staff — when I woke up Wednesday morning to the news that protests had occurred on campus in the wake of President Obama’s re-election. But as I read articles, Facebook posts and Twitter feeds documenting the blatant use of racial slurs towards not only the president, but other Ole Miss students, my shock turned into anger. And my anger turned into shame.

October 18, 2012

Have you noticed the incessant Facebook posting and tweets regarding this year’s Presidential election? For some reason, a larger portion of the general public and in my opinion, a larger portion of our generation, is paying greater attention to the elections this year. While I think it’s awesome that so many citizens are thinking about who will run the country, I also think there are a few general thoughts or guidelines that people should consider when discussing politics or thinking about the upcoming elections.
First of all, don’t take politics personally.

September 13, 2012

This is a sensitive issue, I’m quite aware. Native Ole Miss students are hypersensitive to out-of-state students who have not been lifelong Ole Miss fans and have allegiances to more than one football team.
I, having grown up in New Orleans to an LSU alum, hold dual fandom and have been called a traitor for even suggesting that I like LSU.
Please refrain from tweeting me things about corndogs; I don’t understand that comment and I fear I never will.

September 10, 2012

What has been a big controversy since the beginning of the school year has received student and faculty responses. On Friday in the Grove, a peaceful, non-violent protest was led by the Facebook group, “Smoke Up The Grove,” started by two Ole Miss law students.

What has been a big controversy since the beginning of the school year has received student and faculty responses. On Friday in the Grove, a peaceful, non-violent protest was led by the Facebook group, “Smoke Up The Grove,” started by two Ole Miss law students. The group invited anyone interested in smoking to smoke during the protest. Also, any non-smokers who were against the ban were welcomed to attend the protest. Ole Miss students and faculty protested the zero-tolerance smoking ban by signing a petition to stop the university from passing the zero-tolerance law.

September 7, 2012

The recent decision to ban smoking on campus at the University of Mississippi has been met with criticism from staff and students alike. The criticism is coming to a head today at 1 p.m. in the Grove when a group, led by two school students, will protest the ban.

The recent decision to ban smoking on campus at the University of Mississippi has been met with criticism from staff and students alike. The criticism is coming to a head today at 1 p.m. in the Grove when a group, led by two school students, will protest the ban. Chase Bradstreet and Kyle Jones are third-year law students and casual smokers. The duo started a Facebook group called “Smoke Up The Grove” which invites anyone interested to smoke cigars or cigarettes during the protest. The smoking ban will not be fully enforced until Jan. 1, 2013.

September 4, 2012

Tweeting has become second nature for some of us. You tweet what your friend wore to a party the night before, you tweet what you wore to the same party and then you tweet who looked better.
Tweeting has become a vital part of our social, personal and professional lives. Next to Facebook, it’s that all-important action that keeps you connected and pertinent in this digital world in which we live.

August 22, 2012

Maybe privacy is overrated. Maybe asking someone if you can use their personal opinions as endorsements is just a common courtesy that’s outdated in this digital and technological world that we now live in.
And maybe Republican Todd Akin will be the keynote speaker at the next National Organization for Women’s conference too. Right after Akin congratulates Joe Biden on shooing himself and President Obama right back into the White House with his winning speech at a recent Virginia rally.

July 11, 2012

 
Beginning this column with “When I was in high school” just didn’t seem like the most attention-getting way of making a point. However, it’s unavoidable, due to the content. So, let me apologize up front. 

July 9, 2012

 
Living in the age of social networks, it's easy to find several local business pages to "Like." Some businesses, however, steer clear of or seldom update their Facebook pages and only update their business websites, so interested customers are not notified of daily deals, special discounts or new stock. 
Steven Gilbert, creator of www.heyoxford.com has remedied this.

 
Living in the age of social networks, it's easy to find several local business pages to "Like." Some businesses, however, steer clear of or seldom update their Facebook pages and only update their business websites, so interested customers are not notified of daily deals, special discounts or new stock. 

June 19, 2012

 
Last week, the internet community was abuzz with the sound bites of a speech delivered to an unsuspecting crowd of graduation attendees.

June 18, 2012

Recent activity in Maryland, Connecticut, Washington State, Massachusetts and New Jersey raise alarm and hope for employees’ privacy rights. 

 
Recent activity in Maryland, Connecticut, Washington State, Massachusetts and New Jersey raise alarm and hope for employees’ privacy rights. 
After complaints from employees being forced to divulge social media passwords to their employers, states took action to prevent further privacy breaches. 
The Password Privacy Act of 2012 builds on the existing law of Computer Fraud and Abuse Act. 
Initially, the law was used as a tool for individuals to protect themselves from hackers. 

June 18, 2012

Recent activity in Maryland, Connecticut, Washington State, Massachusetts and New Jersey raise alarm and hope for employees’ privacy rights. 

 
Recent activity in Maryland, Connecticut, Washington State, Massachusetts and New Jersey raise alarm and hope for employees’ privacy rights. 
After complaints from employees being forced to divulge social media passwords to their employers, states took action to prevent further privacy breaches. 
The Password Privacy Act of 2012 builds on the existing law of Computer Fraud and Abuse Act. 
Initially, the law was used as a tool for individuals to protect themselves from hackers. 

June 13, 2012

Eighteen billion dollars – that’s the value of Mark Zuckerberg’s brainchild, Facebook. A website made popular by college students trying to see pictures to help recall what happened at parties or to stalk their exes is somehow worth as much as the GDP of Guatemala.

June 13, 2012

Eighteen billion dollars – that’s the value of Mark Zuckerberg’s brainchild, Facebook. A website made popular by college students trying to see pictures to help recall what happened at parties or to stalk their exes is somehow worth as much as the GDP of Guatemala.

May 31, 2012

As students at one of the nation’s top party schools, many of us are familiar with the concept “liquid courage.” We, or someone we know, have had a few drinks and subsequently acted with gusto in a way we would not have acted without the help of alcohol.
The Internet, its allowance of anonymity and the creation of “false distance” have revolutionized what I call “digital courage.” This is the courage we have to say and do things through digital media that we normally would not say or do in face-to-face interaction.

April 23, 2012

 

Last week, the U.S. media circuit was abuzz after Hilary Rosen, a prominent Washington insider and well-known adviser to many members of the Democratic Party, made an insensitive statement in which she said that the Republican Party nominee Mitt Romney’s wife, Ann, “had never worked a day in her life.”