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Content about Charles Ross

October 2, 2012

Actor and musician Harry Belafonte spoke to a packed house at the Ford Center Monday night.

Actor and musician Harry Belafonte spoke to a packed house at the Ford Center Monday night. “Civil rights is not just a movement, it’s a way of life,” Belafonte said. Chancellor Dan Jones opened the ceremony with a brief statement about the day’s meaning for The Uni- versity of Mississippi. With the help of faculty members and a civil rights committee, headed by university profes- sor Charles Ross, the univer- sity was able to organize a series of events that will continue throughout the year.

June 27, 2012

In the first volume of the book, The Life of Reason, author George Santayana wrote: “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.”
 
The University of Mississippi will remember its own past and work to grow from it with “Opening the Closed Society: 50 Years of Integration,” a year-long celebration of diversity at Ole Miss organized by the university’s civil rights subcommittee.

In the first volume of the book, The Life of Reason, author George Santayana wrote: “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.”

The University of Mississippi will remember its own past and work to grow from it with “Opening the Closed Society: 50 Years of Integration,” a year-long celebration of diversity at Ole Miss organized by the university’s civil rights subcommittee.
 

March 2, 2012

A quote from Myrlie Evers-Williams on the James Meredith monument at the University of Mississippi between the J.D. Williams Library and the Lyceum reads “Yes Mississippi was ... but now Mississippi is.”

 

A quote from Myrlie Evers-Williams on the James Meredith monument at the University of Mississippi between the J.D. Williams Library and the Lyceum reads “Yes Mississippi was ... but now Mississippi is.”

Evers-Williams speaks from experience. Nearly 50 years ago, her husband Medgar Evers was gunned down in their carport by staunch segregationist Byron De La Beckwith.

Most of the world was introduced to Evers-Williams as the widow of Evers on the cover of LIFE magazine.

January 23, 2012

Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his famous “I have a dream” speech nearly 49 years ago, rallying over 200,000 civil rights supporters in Washington, D.C., during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his famous “I have a dream” speech nearly 49 years ago, rallying over 200,000 civil rights supporters in Washington, D.C., during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.
Just over a week ago, Kelly Shannon and a group of University of Mississippi students were recognized for their efforts, this time through community service in King’s name.
King’s legacy lives on through Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, celebrated as a national holiday in the United States and observed as far away as Hiroshima.

February 27, 2011

Charles Ross, director of the African-American studies department at the University of Mississippi, never dreamed that football would inspire his thesis. 

Raised in Columbus, Ohio, Ross studied history at Stillman College in Tuscaloosa, Ala. 

Following his undergraduate program, Ross returned to Ohio. Unsure of what he wanted to do, he spent almost two years working for the federal government before returning to academics.

February 15, 2011

Mississippi is making an effort to heal racial transgressions of the past by constructing a museum to celebrate African-American history and culture.

Mississippi is making an effort to heal racial transgressions of the past by constructing a museum to celebrate African-American history and culture.

Charles Ross, director of African-American studies at the University of Mississippi, said he supports the idea of a museum being built.

“The fact that (Mississippi) does not have a museum that recognizes the struggle is a real void that is long overdue, and hopefully is something that will take place rather quickly,” Ross said.

February 1, 2011

African-American Studies director Charles Ross said each February offers the University a chance to move forward.

African-American Studies director Charles Ross said each February offers the University a chance to move forward.

“One of the ways we have been able to move forward as an institution is that we are constantly speaking about race and issues pertaining to race,” Ross said. “We probably have more responsibility than any other institution in the country to continue to dialogue and to ensure that we are not becoming stagnant, that we are not going backwards as it relates to issues surrounding race and racial discourse.”

October 4, 2010

Tomorrow morning, professors Marvin King and Charles Ross will be talking NCAA, money and athletes.

 

Tomorrow morning, professors Marvin King and Charles Ross will be talking NCAA, money and athletes.

 

“Professors normally lecture and you take notes,” said Ross, a history professor. “This is an opportunity to take no notes — it will be back and forth between us and the students.”