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November 27, 2012

With all of the attention surrounding the events on campus following President Obama’s re-election, I’m going to offer an odd suggestion: go see “Cloud Atlas” and “Skyfall.”
What do these films have to do with those events? What in the name of MI6 could they possibly have to do with each other? And how can they help us understand rapidly accelerating technological and social change? I’m going to try to link all these up without spoilering, so bear with me.

November 26, 2012

In President Obama’s first term, 300 drone strikes killed an estimated 2,500 people. Drone strikes are a powerful tool in the war on terror, but they are also a tool without rules.
The New York Times reported yesterday that in the weeks before the presidential election, the Obama administration was scrambling to create guidelines for the use of drones. These rules were to be created in case Obama wasn’t re-elected; the new president would then have a clear set of directives to determine when the use of drone strikes was allowed.

November 15, 2012

An Open Letter to the Student Body,

I am not writing to express any feelings of embarrassment, disappointment, or anger toward the students who shouted racist language and displayed violent behavior after the announcement of our president’s reelection. I am writing to express my concerns regarding the response of the university community to that event.

November 15, 2012

Dear Editor,

I would like to say that the events of last week with the race riots and racial slurs spoken in response to the re-election of President Barack Obama were a painful reminder of one thing: Racism still exist.  I know, being a native Mississippian, that racism still exist there, but for it to happen at Ole Miss is just downright sickening.

November 15, 2012

On election night, communication sciences and disorders senior LaQuoyia Murray posted a response to the disturbance on campus that followed the reelection of President Obama on her Facebook page.

On election night, communication sciences and disorders senior LaQuoyia Murray posted a response to the disturbance on campus that followed the reelection of President Obama on her Facebook page.

“It basically just said how disgusted I was with the people that participated in the quote, unquote riots that happened that night,” she said. “I felt disgusted that students at our school would even go to those lengths with the racial slurs.”

Murray said she did call those students “racists” in her post.

November 14, 2012

Jeffrey Jackson, associate professor of sociology at The University of Mississippi, was recently selected as the Mississippi Humanities Council’s 2012 Teacher of the Year.

Jeffrey Jackson, associate professor of sociology at The University of Mississippi, was recently selected as the Mississippi Humanities Council’s 2012 Teacher of the Year.

The Humanities Teacher Awards recognize the contributions of humanities faculty at each of the state’s colleges and universities. Nominations are made by the college president or humanities dean, and Jackson’s name was put forward for the award because he had previously won the Cora Lee Graham Award for Outstanding Teaching of Freshmen.

November 13, 2012

As student leaders of The University of Mississippi, we want to respond to the incidents that occurred on our campus last Tuesday night.  The hateful, small-minded actions committed by some students are unacceptable and embarrassing; they have tarnished the reputation of the university we love so dearly.

November 12, 2012

The Christian Science Monitor of Nov. 7 reported that youth voters once again influenced the outcome of the presidential election.

The Christian Science Monitor of Nov. 7 reported that youth voters once again influenced the outcome of the presidential election.

Citing data from the National Exit Poll, The Monitor reported that millennials aged 18 to 29 made up 19 percent of the electorate in this election cycle, up one percentage point from 2008, which was already a record-breaking youth vote turnout.

President Obama, again, won the support of young voters; The Monitor reports he carried 60 percent of millennial voters compared to the 37 percent who favored Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney.

November 11, 2012

The Ole Miss Young Americans for Liberty (YAL) held their semesterly banned book reading Friday. 

The Ole Miss Young Americans for Liberty (YAL) held their semesterly banned book reading Friday.

In the wake of the postelection disturbance Tuesday night, the YAL read “All Quiet on the Western Front” by Erich Maria Remarque from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on the porch of Bondurant Hall to promote peace, wisdom and liberty rather than hate, ignorance and incivility.

The book was banned in many European countries for its graphic descriptions of World War I.

November 8, 2012

This past weekend I had the opportunity to canvass for President Barack Obama with the Ole Miss College Democrats. Mississippi State Rep. Tommy Reynolds provided the transportation to Florida, and once we got there, he provided the inspiration for the volunteers.
I recall him explaining why he drove us 11 hours to campaign in the heavily contested state of Florida.
“I’m in this for my son,” Reynolds said.

November 8, 2012

This year was meant to be a symbol of the progress that The University of Mississippi has made. Every member of the student body knew we were celebrating 50 years of integration and that the university has a history of prejudice and hate, which the Ole Miss community wanted to prove we had overcome. Because of the actions of a select few, it appears to the nation we haven’t.

November 8, 2012

For me, Election Day was unbelievably conflicting. I was proud of my country for choosing to move forward with President Obama – the democratic election process was successful once again. Sadly, my joy soon turned to disappointment when I heard how a small group of our students reacted to the president’s re-election. Ole Miss made national headlines for the protests following the president’s victory, and, as a result, we may have lost any credibility we gained as a progressive institution.

November 8, 2012

To the Editors of The Daily Mississippian,

The events on campus during election night were morally reprehensible at a time that should have been, of all things, about moving forward. This is not in reference to the reelected president’s campaign slogan, or favoring one political ideology over the other. The American ideal has always been to strive towards greater things together, as one nation. We disagree, sometimes severely, but we work to achieve a common ground.

November 8, 2012

Dear Editor,

November 8, 2012

Two arrests were made early Wednesday morning during a disturbance on campus that followed the election results Tuesday night, but no one was injured according to University officials.

Two arrests were made early Wednesday morning during a disturbance on campus that followed the election results Tuesday night, but no one was injured according to University officials.
 
Chancellor Dan Jones said the use of the term “riot” was inappropriate in light of the real scale of the event.
 
University Police Chief Calvin Sellars declined to provide details about the disturbance beyond the statements made by university officials.
 

November 8, 2012

In one word, I was shocked.
Shocked like so many other members of the Ole Miss family — students, alumni, faculty and staff — when I woke up Wednesday morning to the news that protests had occurred on campus in the wake of President Obama’s re-election. But as I read articles, Facebook posts and Twitter feeds documenting the blatant use of racial slurs towards not only the president, but other Ole Miss students, my shock turned into anger. And my anger turned into shame.

November 7, 2012

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama rolled to re-election Tuesday night, vanquishing former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney despite a weak economy that plagued his first term and put a crimp in the middle class dreams of millions. In victory, he confidently promised better days ahead.

 
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama rolled to re-election Tuesday night, vanquishing former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney despite a weak economy that plagued his first term and put a crimp in the middle class dreams of millions. In victory, he confidently promised better days ahead.

November 7, 2012

Supporters of President Barack Obama gathered at the watch party at City Grocery on the Square on Tuesday night to watch the election results and cheered as President Obama was declared the winner after he was projected to win the state of Ohio.

Jesse Kelley, a third-year law student, could not contain her enthusiasm.
“I’m so excited,” she said.

Kelley explained why she voted for Obama in the election.

“I worked with the women’s campaign fund this past summer, and we support non-partisan women candidates who are pro-choice, and so that’s my keynote issue,” she said.

November 7, 2012

Hundreds of Ole Miss students exchanged racial epithets and violent,politicized chants in response to the announcement of the re-election of President Barack Obama.

Hundreds of Ole Miss students exchanged racial epithets and violent,politicized chants in response to the announcement of the re-election of President Barack Obama.

What began as an argument around midnight quickly spread across campus.

UPD responded to a fire alarm being pulled in Brown Hall as crowds gathered near
Kincannon and Stockard.

Just as all seemed to calm down, those in disagreement moved to the Grove.

UPD cleared the Grove on the grounds that it closes at midnight.
Displeased, crowds continued to grow and returned to Kincannon.

November 6, 2012

According to various news sources President Obama has won Vermont's four electoral votes with 0 percent of precincts reporting.  Gov. Romney has won Kentucky's eight electoral votes with 15 percent of precincts reporting and Indiana's 11 electoral votes with eight percent of precincts reporting.
Currently, Gov. Romney is leading in the polls in Virginia with 58 percent of the vote to President Obama's 41 percent.  Only 1 percent of precincts are reporting in Virginia.

November 6, 2012

President Obama projected by various news sources to take Illinois, Maryland, Maine, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Delaware, and Washington D.C.  He is leading in battleground states Ohio and Florida by 19 percent and one percent respectively.
Gov. Romney is projected to have gained Oklahoma.  He is leading in Virginia and North Carolina by 19 percent and one percent respectively.
Obama has 64 electoral votes to Romney's 40.  270 electoral votes is required to win.

November 6, 2012

According to various news sources Gov. Romney has gained the support of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Arkansas,  Tennessee, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Texas, Louisiana, Wyoming and Mississippi.
President Obama has gained the support of New York, New Jersey and Michigan.  He is also leading in seven of the nine battleground states.
The current electoral count puts Gov. Romney ahead of President Obama in the electoral vote count 152-123.  One of the candidates must receive 270 electoral votes to win the presidency.

November 6, 2012

Various news sources have called New Hampshire for President Obama with 25 percent of the precincts reporting.  The president is beating Gov. Romney 54 to 44 percent.
Gov. Romney has been projected to win in Utah with 15 percent of the state's precincts reporting.  He currently holds an 18 percent margin over President Obama. 
Currently, President Obama has 147 electoral votes to Gov. Romney's 158 votes.  The popular vote is still in Gov. Romney's favor.  He holds 51 percent of the popular vote to the president's 48 percent.

November 6, 2012

CNN, NBC, CBS and FOX News have projected that President Obama has won California, Washington, Hawaii, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, Oregon, New Mexico and Ohio.
This confirms that President Obama has won the election.
The only states that remain to be decided are Virginia, Florida, Nevada, Colorado and Alaska and the president is leading in three of the five states. 
President Obama currently has 274 electoral votes, which is enough to clinch the election.