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Content about Myrlie Evers-Williams

March 5, 2012

 

This past Friday, I had the pleasure of listening to Myrlie Evers-Williams, civil rights activist and wife of the late Medgar Evers. Evers-Williams has experienced so much in her lifetime — witnessing the assassination of her husband, the integration of the University of Mississippi and countless civil rights and women’s rights events. However, Evers-Williams did not just witness history; she helped create it. 

 

This past Friday, I had the pleasure of listening to Myrlie Evers-Williams, civil rights activist and wife of the late Medgar Evers. Evers-Williams has experienced so much in her lifetime — witnessing the assassination of her husband, the integration of the University of Mississippi and countless civil rights and women’s rights events. However, Evers-Williams did not just witness history; she helped create it. 

March 5, 2012

In all my years, I’ve never gained so much insight and knowledge in one sitting. I sat in Fulton Chapel this past Friday listening to the wisdom of a civil rights activist’s widow, lecturer, advocate and, most of all, a black woman. 

 

In all my years, I’ve never gained so much insight and knowledge in one sitting. I sat in Fulton Chapel this past Friday listening to the wisdom of a civil rights activist’s widow, lecturer, advocate and, most of all, a black woman. 

As I sat and listened to the beautifully constructed words of Myrlie Evers-Williams, the widow of Medgar Evers, I was overwhelmed by her willingness to engage in open, honest dialogue. Arguably, that speech was by far one of the greatest speeches I’ve ever heard in my life. 

March 2, 2012

A quote from Myrlie Evers-Williams on the James Meredith monument at the University of Mississippi between the J.D. Williams Library and the Lyceum reads “Yes Mississippi was ... but now Mississippi is.”

 

A quote from Myrlie Evers-Williams on the James Meredith monument at the University of Mississippi between the J.D. Williams Library and the Lyceum reads “Yes Mississippi was ... but now Mississippi is.”

Evers-Williams speaks from experience. Nearly 50 years ago, her husband Medgar Evers was gunned down in their carport by staunch segregationist Byron De La Beckwith.

Most of the world was introduced to Evers-Williams as the widow of Evers on the cover of LIFE magazine.