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Content about James Meredith

November 8, 2012

Dear Ole Miss students who protested by shouting racial slurs and burning an Obama/Biden sign on election night,

October 29, 2012

 
The Peabody Award-winning ESPN documentary series “30 for 30” continues with tonight’s episode, “Ghost of Ole Miss.” The narrative, based on the long-format story by ESPN.com writer and Oxford resident Wright Thompson, who wrote and narrated the 1-hour documentary, explores the intersection in history of the undefeated 1962 Ole Miss football team and the integration of The University of Mississippi. Thompson worked with Peabody Award-winning director Fritz Mitchell on the project. Mitchell started his television career as a researcher for CBS Sports in 1982 and has produced other long-format documentaries for ESPN and PBS.

 

October 26, 2012

On Oct. 1, 1962, James Meredith became the first black man to attend Ole Miss, making history and changing the future of The University of Mississippi forever.

On Oct. 1, 1962, James Meredith became the first black man to attend Ole Miss, making history and changing the future of The University of Mississippi forever.
 
To commemorate the occasion, the university is hosting a number of events centering on Meredith to celebrate the anniversary, labeling it “50 Years of Integration: Opening the Closed Society.”
 

October 26, 2012

Riots overtook The University of Mississippi on Sept. 30, 1962. The reason – the pigment of a single man’s skin.

 

Riots overtook The University of Mississippi on Sept. 30, 1962. The reason – the pigment of a single man’s skin.
 
The admission of James Meredith, the first black person integrated into Ole Miss, created an integration struggle that allowed prejudice to hang heavily in the air.
 

October 26, 2012

Many students and faculty associate James Meredith’s arrival with the opening of the doors of opportunity to the black community. But to Ariel Blanco, president of the Latin American Student Association, the promotion of Meredith’s integration signifies something more.

 

Many students and faculty associate James Meredith’s arrival with the opening of the doors of opportunity to the black community. But to Ariel Blanco, president of the Latin American Student Association, the promotion of Meredith’s integration signifies something more.
 
“Integration means a mix of cultures, ethnic, racial, religious and creed differences,” Blanco said. “It means bringing all of these together into one.”

October 26, 2012

Fifty years ago on Sept. 30, 1962, the familiar sights of the Grove, the Lyceum and the Circle were grotesque images filled with smoke, chaos and hatred.

 

Fifty years ago on Sept. 30, 1962, the familiar sights of the Grove, the Lyceum and the Circle were grotesque images filled with smoke, chaos and hatred.
 
Bobby King, a Corinth native who was a journalism senior at Ole Miss in 1962, said Sept. 30 started out just like every other Sunday.
 

October 18, 2012

As Ole Miss and Auburn fans mingled in the Grove and the Circle, in a quiet corner, away from the noise, James Meredith sat with friend Hiram Eastland. In a rare opportunity, they spoke with student journalists, Meredith’s first on-campus interview in 50 years.

     As Ole Miss and Auburn fans mingled in the Grove and the Circle, in a quiet corner, away from the noise, James Meredith sat with friend Hiram Eastland. In a rare opportunity, they spoke with student journalists, Meredith’s first on-campus interview in 50 years.

October 18, 2012

As Ole Miss and Auburn fans mingled in the Grove and the Circle, in a quiet corner, away from the noise, James Meredith sat with friend Hiram Eastland. In a rare opportunity, they spoke with student journalists, Meredith’s first on-campus interview in 50 years.

     As Ole Miss and Auburn fans mingled in the Grove and the Circle, in a quiet corner, away from the noise, James Meredith sat with friend Hiram Eastland. In a rare opportunity, they spoke with student journalists, Meredith’s first on-campus interview in 50 years.

October 9, 2012

A new Freedom Trail marker was unveiled at the J.D. Williams Library last week.

A new Freedom Trail marker was unveiled at the J.D. Williams Library last week. Oxford mayor Pat Patterson, Chancellor Dan Jones and officials of the Mississippi Development Authority’s (MDA) tourism department made the presentation this past Friday, Sept. 29, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of James Meredith’s enrollment at The University of Mississippi. The marker is the seventh of 30 initial markers placed along the Freedom Trail, a commemorative series of locations integral to the history of the civil rights struggle in Mississippi.

October 7, 2012

This week marks 50 years of integration at The University of Mississippi. It is important that we take time to reflect on the progress the university has made to transform its obstinate outlook during the civil rights movement to a more open and accepting place.  Looking beyond the university, it is much more important to focus on the accomplishments of black alumni as they have followed the legacy of James Meredith in opening up a once closed society.

October 7, 2012

This week marks 50 years of integration at The University of Mississippi. It is important that we take time to reflect on the progress the university has made to transform its obstinate outlook during the civil rights movement to a more open and accepting place.  Looking beyond the university, it is much more important to focus on the accomplishments of black alumni as they have followed the legacy of James Meredith in opening up a once closed society.

October 5, 2012

Professor and historian David Sansing hosted a discussion at the Overby Center for Southern Journalism and Politics Thursday morning to assess the progress made at The University of Mississippi since the enrollment of James Meredith.

Professor and historian David Sansing hosted a discussion at the Overby Center for Southern Journalism and Politics Thursday morning to assess the progress made at The University of Mississippi since the enrollment of James Meredith. The panel was composed of Sansing; Donald Cole, assistant provost and assistant to the chancellor concerning minority affairs; Valeria Ross, assistant dean of students for multicultural affairs and volunteer services; and former provost Gerald Walton. Nearly 120 students, faculty, administrators and other community members were in attendance.

October 5, 2012

Professor and historian David Sansing hosted a discussion at the Overby Center for Southern Journalism and Politics Thursday morning to assess the progress made at The University of Mississippi since the enrollment of James Meredith.

Professor and historian David Sansing hosted a discussion at the Overby Center for Southern Journalism and Politics Thursday morning to assess the progress made at The University of Mississippi since the enrollment of James Meredith. The panel was composed of Sansing; Donald Cole, assistant provost and assistant to the chancellor concerning minority affairs; Valeria Ross, assistant dean of students for multicultural affairs and volunteer services; and former provost Gerald Walton. Nearly 120 students, faculty, administrators and other community members were in attendance.

October 5, 2012

Retired Bishop Duncan Gray Jr. of the Episcopal Diocese of Mississippi is donating a personal collection of documents chronicling the period of integration at The University of Mississippi to the J.D. Williams Library special collection of civil rights history.

Retired Bishop Duncan Gray Jr. of the Episcopal Diocese of Mississippi is donating a personal collection of documents chronicling the period of integration at The University of Mississippi to the J.D. Williams Library special collection of civil rights history. The Civil Rights collection housed within the J.D. Williams Library Archives and Special Collections contains writings from notable personalities including James Meredith.

October 4, 2012

The scrapbooks of newspaper clippings Robert “Bob” Herring III recently donated to the J.D. Williams Library Archives and Special Collections immortalize daily media accounts of the events surrounding James Meredith and the integration of The University of Mississippi in 1962.

The scrapbooks of newspaper clippings Robert “Bob” Herring III recently donated to the J.D. Williams Library Archives and Special Collections immortalize daily media accounts of the events surrounding James Meredith and the integration of The University of Mississippi in 1962.
The three scrapbooks, composed of various news sources including the Oxford Eagle, The Clarion-Ledger and the Jackson Daily News, offer a comprehensive view of integration at Ole Miss.

October 4, 2012

“I believe in segregation like I believe in Jesus.”
The previous statement is entirely fictitious. Admittedly embellished, as well, yet it embodies the ideology of some of those who were strongly opposed to James Meredith enrolling in classes at The University of Mississippi.
Meredith had to overcome more than Ross Barnett’s personal rejection to the university. He had to overcome more than the then-chancellor’s comment that his denial of admittance was not contingent on him “being a Negro.”

October 4, 2012

“I believe in segregation like I believe in Jesus.”
The previous statement is entirely fictitious. Admittedly embellished, as well, yet it embodies the ideology of some of those who were strongly opposed to James Meredith enrolling in classes at The University of Mississippi.
Meredith had to overcome more than Ross Barnett’s personal rejection to the university. He had to overcome more than the then-chancellor’s comment that his denial of admittance was not contingent on him “being a Negro.”

October 3, 2012

Among the events held to commemorate 50 years of in-tegration at Ole Miss, Lt. Hen- ry Gallagher retold the story from his viewpoint as James Meredith’s personal security guard.

Among the events held to commemorate 50 years of integration at Ole Miss, Lt. Henry Gallagher retold the story from his viewpoint as James Meredith’s personal security guard. “We thought we were going on a routine exercise,” Galla- gher said. “Two army units that arrived on campus to confront the mob had prior knowledge of what they were going into; at the time, our mission was not told.” Gallagher said the Justice Department wanted Meredith to be free to come and go across the campus as a student.

October 2, 2012

On the 50th anniversary of James Meredith’s admission to The University of Mis- sissippi, the Black Student Union paid tribute to Mere- dith by unveiling dedication markers.

On the 50th anniversary of James Meredith’s admission to The University of Mis- sissippi, the Black Student Union paid tribute to Mere- dith by unveiling dedication markers. Donald Cole, assistant provost and assistant to the chancellor for minority af- fairs, reflected on the strug- gles Meredith faced as the only black student at the uni- versity. “The precedent that he set is the fact that he persisted to graduation,” Cole said.

October 2, 2012

Oct. 1, 1962, is a date every Ole Miss student should know. It was the day James Meredith successfully registered as a student, thus integrating The University of Mississippi and “opening the closed society.” It was the day progress began at our university.

October 2, 2012

Oct. 1, 1962, is a date every Ole Miss student should know. It was the day James Meredith successfully registered as a student, thus integrating The University of Mississippi and “opening the closed society.” It was the day progress began at our university.

October 2, 2012

I’ll never forget the first conversation I had with James Meredith. I answered the phone and he mumbled softly, “Hello, this is James Meredith. Is this the president of the Ole Miss student body?” I replied, “Yes, this is.” I immediately stopped what I was doing and gave the phone my undivided attention. I could hardly believe James Meredith was actually on the phone. We talked for a while about my recent election, and he congratulated me on my success.  

October 2, 2012

I’ll never forget the first conversation I had with James Meredith. I answered the phone and he mumbled softly, “Hello, this is James Meredith. Is this the president of the Ole Miss student body?” I replied, “Yes, this is.” I immediately stopped what I was doing and gave the phone my undivided attention. I could hardly believe James Meredith was actually on the phone. We talked for a while about my recent election, and he congratulated me on my success.  

October 2, 2012

In 1962, U.S. Marshals were ordered to go to The Univer- sity of Mississippi to escort James Meredith so he could enroll in classes. Five of those marshals returned to the Ole Miss Student Union Monday morning to speak about their experience on campus during the 1962 integration.

In 1962, U.S. Marshals were ordered to go to The Univer- sity of Mississippi to escort James Meredith so he could enroll in classes. Five of those marshals returned to the Ole Miss Student Union Monday morning to speak about their experience on campus during the 1962 integration. People filled the ballroom in the Union to hear the panel of five former U.S. Marshals and the James Meredith’s son, John Meredith.