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Content about History of the United States

November 5, 2012

When the American Consulate in Benghazi was attacked on Sept. 11, the story seemed pretty clear. Demonstrations in the capital, coinciding with the release of a poorly made video mocking the prophet Muhammad, had led to an outburst of violence that killed four Americans, including Libyan ambassador Chris Stevens.

October 18, 2012

As Ole Miss and Auburn fans mingled in the Grove and the Circle, in a quiet corner, away from the noise, James Meredith sat with friend Hiram Eastland. In a rare opportunity, they spoke with student journalists, Meredith’s first on-campus interview in 50 years.

     As Ole Miss and Auburn fans mingled in the Grove and the Circle, in a quiet corner, away from the noise, James Meredith sat with friend Hiram Eastland. In a rare opportunity, they spoke with student journalists, Meredith’s first on-campus interview in 50 years.

October 5, 2012

Professor and historian David Sansing hosted a discussion at the Overby Center for Southern Journalism and Politics Thursday morning to assess the progress made at The University of Mississippi since the enrollment of James Meredith.

Professor and historian David Sansing hosted a discussion at the Overby Center for Southern Journalism and Politics Thursday morning to assess the progress made at The University of Mississippi since the enrollment of James Meredith. The panel was composed of Sansing; Donald Cole, assistant provost and assistant to the chancellor concerning minority affairs; Valeria Ross, assistant dean of students for multicultural affairs and volunteer services; and former provost Gerald Walton. Nearly 120 students, faculty, administrators and other community members were in attendance.

October 4, 2012

“I believe in segregation like I believe in Jesus.”
The previous statement is entirely fictitious. Admittedly embellished, as well, yet it embodies the ideology of some of those who were strongly opposed to James Meredith enrolling in classes at The University of Mississippi.
Meredith had to overcome more than Ross Barnett’s personal rejection to the university. He had to overcome more than the then-chancellor’s comment that his denial of admittance was not contingent on him “being a Negro.”

October 2, 2012

I’ll never forget the first conversation I had with James Meredith. I answered the phone and he mumbled softly, “Hello, this is James Meredith. Is this the president of the Ole Miss student body?” I replied, “Yes, this is.” I immediately stopped what I was doing and gave the phone my undivided attention. I could hardly believe James Meredith was actually on the phone. We talked for a while about my recent election, and he congratulated me on my success.  

October 2, 2012

In 1962, U.S. Marshals were ordered to go to The Univer- sity of Mississippi to escort James Meredith so he could enroll in classes. Five of those marshals returned to the Ole Miss Student Union Monday morning to speak about their experience on campus during the 1962 integration.

In 1962, U.S. Marshals were ordered to go to The Univer- sity of Mississippi to escort James Meredith so he could enroll in classes. Five of those marshals returned to the Ole Miss Student Union Monday morning to speak about their experience on campus during the 1962 integration. People filled the ballroom in the Union to hear the panel of five former U.S. Marshals and the James Meredith’s son, John Meredith.

August 29, 2012

James Meredith will be in Oxford this weekend as the 50th anniversary of his admission into Ole Miss approaches, but the purpose of his visit has nothing to do with the historic milestone 

James Meredith will be in Oxford this weekend as the 50th anniversary of his admission into Ole Miss approaches, but the purpose of his visit has nothing to do with the historic milestone.

June 27, 2012

In the first volume of the book, The Life of Reason, author George Santayana wrote: “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.”
 
The University of Mississippi will remember its own past and work to grow from it with “Opening the Closed Society: 50 Years of Integration,” a year-long celebration of diversity at Ole Miss organized by the university’s civil rights subcommittee.

In the first volume of the book, The Life of Reason, author George Santayana wrote: “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.”

The University of Mississippi will remember its own past and work to grow from it with “Opening the Closed Society: 50 Years of Integration,” a year-long celebration of diversity at Ole Miss organized by the university’s civil rights subcommittee.
 

April 10, 2012

 

One hot September Saturday in the Grove, people pounded the air to the tune of “From Dixie With Love,” in sympathy of the end of an era: the removal and replacement of Colonel Reb. 

 

One hot September Saturday in the Grove, people pounded the air to the tune of “From Dixie With Love,” in sympathy of the end of an era: the removal and replacement of Colonel Reb. 

It began in 1997 when the Confederate flag was barred from being flown around the football stadium so Tommy Tuberville could recruit a few top-notch black athletes. It continued onward to the banning of Colonel Reb from the sidelines in 2003 to eventual replacement on Ole Miss merchandise by a black bear in 2010. 

March 5, 2012

 

This past Friday, I had the pleasure of listening to Myrlie Evers-Williams, civil rights activist and wife of the late Medgar Evers. Evers-Williams has experienced so much in her lifetime — witnessing the assassination of her husband, the integration of the University of Mississippi and countless civil rights and women’s rights events. However, Evers-Williams did not just witness history; she helped create it. 

 

This past Friday, I had the pleasure of listening to Myrlie Evers-Williams, civil rights activist and wife of the late Medgar Evers. Evers-Williams has experienced so much in her lifetime — witnessing the assassination of her husband, the integration of the University of Mississippi and countless civil rights and women’s rights events. However, Evers-Williams did not just witness history; she helped create it. 

March 5, 2012

In all my years, I’ve never gained so much insight and knowledge in one sitting. I sat in Fulton Chapel this past Friday listening to the wisdom of a civil rights activist’s widow, lecturer, advocate and, most of all, a black woman. 

 

In all my years, I’ve never gained so much insight and knowledge in one sitting. I sat in Fulton Chapel this past Friday listening to the wisdom of a civil rights activist’s widow, lecturer, advocate and, most of all, a black woman. 

As I sat and listened to the beautifully constructed words of Myrlie Evers-Williams, the widow of Medgar Evers, I was overwhelmed by her willingness to engage in open, honest dialogue. Arguably, that speech was by far one of the greatest speeches I’ve ever heard in my life. 

March 2, 2012

A quote from Myrlie Evers-Williams on the James Meredith monument at the University of Mississippi between the J.D. Williams Library and the Lyceum reads “Yes Mississippi was ... but now Mississippi is.”

 

A quote from Myrlie Evers-Williams on the James Meredith monument at the University of Mississippi between the J.D. Williams Library and the Lyceum reads “Yes Mississippi was ... but now Mississippi is.”

Evers-Williams speaks from experience. Nearly 50 years ago, her husband Medgar Evers was gunned down in their carport by staunch segregationist Byron De La Beckwith.

Most of the world was introduced to Evers-Williams as the widow of Evers on the cover of LIFE magazine.

September 9, 2011

 

I’m often guilty of “outing” others for scandalous transgressions and abuses of their power, but every now and then I catch myself writing patriotic, uplifting stories (just to throw you off).

You remember Sept. 11, 2001 and where you were that day, correct?

May 18, 2011

Fifty-six years after the murder of 14-year-old Emmett Till, the state is officially recognizing the event's place in Mississippi history.

Fifty-six years after the murder of 14-year-old Emmett Till, the state is officially recognizing the event's place in Misissippi history.

Till allegedly whistled at a white woman in a store in Money, Miss. and that's now the first stop on the state's Civil Rights Trail.

Till's family members, local residents and politicians were among those present at the unveiling of the Bryant's Grocey Historical Marker.

This is the first marker to be unveiled on the trail. Eventually there will be 25 markers in all.

January 25, 2011

I recently read an article on former CIA spy Duane R. Clarridge, and to put it mildly, I was amazed. Now, I’m no expert on covert operations, but I’ve seen my fair share of Mission Impossible reruns. 

 

I recently read an article on former CIA spy Duane R. Clarridge, and to put it mildly, I was amazed. Now, I’m no expert on covert operations, but I’ve seen my fair share of Mission Impossible reruns. 

 

August 26, 2010

 

SUMNER -- They passed the pen among themselves. Black hand to white hand, white hand to black hand. And one by one, all 14 wrote their names on an antique brown sheet of paper.

 

EDITOR’S NOTE: produced by the Delta Project, an in-depth report from the Meek School of Journalism and New Media at the University of Mississippi. This is the first of a series of articles to be run in The Daily Mississippian.