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Tweeting for bucks

abbeangela@gmail.com

 

How’d you like to get $10,000 or more per tweet? 

Well, according to an article in The Clarion Ledger, if your last name is along the lines of Kardashian, Spelling or Dogg, you just might be able to pull it off.

It seems Twitter is revolutionizing the way merchants hawk their wares. Since their inception some five years ago, the online avenue for all things “tweetable” has transformed the way people shop, vote and start revolutions. 

And now with celebrity endorsements finding their way onto the 140-character boxes, it’s changing the entire business of famous recommendations with one carefully chosen word at a time. 

The possibility of earning $10,000 per post is a pretty good paycheck if you ask me. Of course, no one did, but, according to the AP story, that averages out to about $71 per character. You probably get an extra grand for adding a smiley face or something. That would definitely encourage me to hone my tweeting skills to an art form. 

But doesn’t that kind of advertising limit the sponsor as far as who will see and read the posts? It’s certainly only going to reach the people following that particular celebrity. But if you’re singer Ray J and you urge your 600,000 plus followers to see the movie “Saw 3D,” as the article stated, you can pretty much count on your part of that $10,000 being deposited directly into your bank account the second you add the hashtag. 

The companies that advertisers hire to pair the right celebrity with the right product, Izea, Ad.ly and twtMob, the three named in the story, use a combination of software algorithms and Hollywood instinct to connect the two exactly. 

Now I’m not sure about algorithms, but I’ve seen instincts used to a science on many occasions and I would have to agree with Ad.ly when they hired Charlie Sheen to tweet for internships.com in March, when Sheen was in the throes of getting fired from the sitcom Two and a Half Men. 

The story said that within an hour of Sheen’s first post, the website got more than 95,000 clicks. Sheen now has more than five million followers. Now that’s instinct.

This form of celebrity endorsement paves the way for a whole new world in advertising, a brand new age of digital awareness for merchants and Hollywood-types; and without us, the tweeting public, knowing it, a monumental discovery on our part as well. 

It just proves, beyond a shadow of a doubt, that no matter where we go, no matter where we try to hide, no matter how many times we fast forward or surf the channels or mute the sound, we can never escape the inevitably, of that dratted thing we despise more than liver and onions (my own personal favorite thing to despise): the commercial!

Angela Rogalski is a senior print journalism major who lives in Abbeville. Follow her on Twitter @abbeangel.